Is The Diamond as Big as the Ritz a satire?

“The Diamond as Big as the Ritz” is good old social satire. By exaggerating certain aspects of American culture – the obsession with wealth in particular – Fitzgerald holds his society up to ridicule.

What is the main idea of the Diamond as Big as the Ritz?

“The Diamond as Big as the Ritz” argues that one can be free only when one is poor. “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz” argues that one can be free only when one is rich.

How does the Diamond as Big as the Ritz end?

Percy is John’s way in to a world of luxury. Percy brings John to his home knowing he would die. He also provides John (and the readers) with the background of his family history. At the end of the novel, we discover that Percy has followed his father back into the mountain to die.

When Was The Diamond as Big as the Ritz written?

The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, allegorical short story about lost illusions, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published in 1922 in Tales of the Jazz Age.

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Where does the Diamond as Big as the Ritz take place?

Much of the story is set in Montana, a setting that may have been inspired by the summer that Fitzgerald spent near White Sulphur Springs, Montana in 1915.

What type of narration do we see in Diamond as Big as the Ritz *?

Third Person (Limited Omniscient)

Where do the Washingtons keep intruders who have discovered the great diamond?

Where do the Washingtons keep intruders who have discovered the great diamond? in a glass-lined pit in the ground.

What is the short story winter dreams about?

Dexter Green is a fourteen-year-old caddy at the Sherry Island Golf Club in Black Bear, Minnesota. At the sight of Judy, he decides to quit his caddying job. … He resolves to follow his “winter dreams” to become the kind of man who would fit into Judy Jones’ wealthy world.

What did Percy collect instead of stamps?

I used to collect them instead of stamps.” “That’s nothing.” Percy had leaned forward and dropped his voice to a low whisper. “That’s nothing at all. My father has a diamond bigger than the Ritz–Carlton Hotel.”

Who wrote about the Jazz Age?

Tales of the Jazz Age, second collection of short works by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published in 1922. Although the title of the collection alludes to the 1920s and the flapper era, all but two pieces were written before 1920.